Fuse blog

Brands, bottles and breastfeeding: sharing stories of early motherhood (Fri, 29 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000)


Introduced by Nat Forster


Guest post by Justine Gallagher, Lecturer at Northumbria University

My own story of infant feeding is based in a community where breastfeeding was, and still is, not the norm. I was the first in my immediate family to breastfeed and I struggled with it in various ways. My breastfeeding journey ended much sooner than I had originally planned, when my son was just six weeks old. Two years later, my own sheer determination helped me to feed my second child, a daughter, for nine months.

Justine's first steps into motherhood
Later, in a professional capacity, I worked supporting families in my role as Community Development Worker in Sure Start Children's Centres. I worked with mothers who had similar feeding stories to my own, as well as many women who had never breastfed. They, like most of the people around me, never had any intention to breastfeed.

The guilt I felt for breastfeeding my first child for a short time stayed with me for a long time. I did not understand why it had such an impact. Why did I feel the need to breastfeed when others around me did not appear to give breastfeeding a second thought? When the opportunity came for me to undertake PhD research, my choice of topic was never in doubt.

My research, which is supervised by Dr Deborah James from Northumbria University, is focused on the infant feeding stories of nine women who live in an area where breastfeeding rates are low. All of the women’s stories are equally important however, for the purposes of this blog I would like to introduce you to Claire (names have been changed to preserve anonymity), who formula fed her baby Sophia from birth.

Claire, her parents and grandparents have lived in the same local area all of their lives. Claire was a single parent and lived with Sophia’s grandparents when her daughter was first born. Sophia’s grandmother took an active part in her care. She looked after Sophia for two nights a week when she was first born, reducing this to just one night per week as time passed. Following a biographical narrative approach, which allows participants to tell their stories without interruption, I asked Claire for her story with the use of a single question;

"So, please can you tell me the story of your experiences of feeding milk to your baby?"
"Well I started when I was pregnant, erm, I’ve always wanted to bottle feed her er, cause there was pink bottles that I wanted to get her erm and also knew the milk that I wanted to put on her erm, and just bottle feeding become very easy to us."

Claire’s story was dominated with discussion of branding and consumer goods. The pink bottles and the various brands of infant formula Claire gave to Sophia reveal the way media and advertising can influence infant feeding practice. Claire demonstrates that she was careful with her bottle-feeding choices. These choices were not arbitrary; she made clear decisions between brands and bottles. Claire wanted me to know that she had made the right choices for her and her daughter.

It was also quite clear that Claire’s identity, as the mother of a daughter, was an important part of her story. The ‘pink’ bottles represent this in a very visible way, she could perform her identity as a mother of a daughter with the right choice of bottle. Claire’s relationship with her own mother was important to her and she appeared keen to demonstrate that this mother-daughter bond would continue for another generation.

These stories help us to understand why some women breastfeed and others do not. Upon reflection, for me, I feel that breastfeeding was about being the best mother I could be, which explains the guilt I felt when I stopped. For Claire, feeding her baby was also about the same thing, only for Claire, being a good mother was about making the right consumption choices. In my thesis, I expand on how Claire’s choices were based on the social norms, the unwritten rules of how to be a mother, in the culture around her.

The impact of advice services on health: moving from gut feeling to concrete evidence (Fri, 22 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000)

Blog post by Alison Dunn, CEO Citizens Advice Gateshead

Two perspectives on arts and public health (Fri, 24 Feb 2017 06:00:00 +0000)

Andrew Fletcher, PhD researcher, Faculty of Health & Life Sciences, Northumbria University

Engagement with the arts and/or creative practice benefits wellbeing in multiple ways. I am a musician and relatively new to public health. This post argues that arts and culture should have greater prominence in health and social care.

Courtesy uk.pinterest.com
So what of arts-based therapies? Compared to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for example, such programmes are not heavily promoted. Perhaps this is right; CBT is cheap and effective, whereas things like music therapy are often reserved for individuals with more complex needs. But this hierarchy contributes to the idea that arts-based therapies are ‘alternative’ – potentially placing them in the same category as, say, homeopathy. This is not a helpful perception, but anyone who’s tried to advocate for creative therapies will know it exists.

Then there’s ‘evidence-based medicine’, which is of critical importance, but whose dominance has been challenged.2,3  This is particularly relevant to approaches to health and wellbeing that are seen as ‘alternative’, which still seem to remain the preserve of those who can afford to try more ‘esoteric’ interventions – thereby reinforcing inequality. So what’s the response? Promote holism*; make arts therapies mainstream; emphasise their part in everyday life; make creativity and cultural engagement as vital as exercise, healthy eating or social interaction. The idea that creativity is intrinsic to wellbeing needs to be established in the early years and beyond, and to neglect this idea is missing a trick.

Courtesy tinybuddha.com
Why do people do art? Usually to express a political statement, to communicate a specific feeling or sentiment, or to satisfy some intangible ‘urge’. Making a painting to hang on your bedroom wall cultivates a more pleasurable living environment; putting your kid’s collage on the fridge boosts self-esteem; and who never listens to music? Creative practice, in one way or another, feeds into numerous wellbeing outcomes. Artists know this instinctively, yet policy around art and culture focuses on tourism and/or entertainment income, and a vague ‘intrinsic’ social value. Lip service is paid to health, but as Tiffany Jenkins says: “If you’re competing with hospitals, you’ll lose”.4

But art and wellbeing are significant components of the lived experience. They make us human. They sit at the apex of Maslow’s hierarchy** and most people understand the inherent value of culture to either social or personal wellbeing. If prevention really is better than cure, we must pay attention to the cultural-wellbeing landscape and the atmosphere these concepts exist in. Perceptions are changed through innovative and creative information delivery – so creativity not only has its own wellbeing outcomes, it’s also the key to shifting arts and culture towards being a major pillar in overall wellbeing.

I can’t help but wonder what the world would be like if the perceptions of arts therapies were different. Stickley (2014)5 outlines one potential scenario as follows:
The year is 2080. A new textbook has been published. The book is called ‘A Century of Healthcare’ and I would like to quote from this book:

"For most of the last century it was unusual for people to be treated holistically. Incredible as it sounds today, healthcare systems separated physical interventions from anything they referred to as "mental". Thus a dualism existed and people were treated as divided objects. At the time, there were many attempts at holism, especially by those who practised alternative or complimentary therapies. However, anything that remotely threatened the domination of the medical model was largely side-lined and researchers gave little credence to anything that was not considered scientific.

We should however give a great deal of credit to those who foresaw the potential contribution that the arts and humanities could make to healthcare and wellness but they operated in a narrow scientific paradigm that gave little acceptance to holism…”
The contexts in which creative practice occurs are complex, but the benefits are multiple and well-known. The key here is changing perceptions. This takes time, but perhaps Stickley’s vision will bear out. I hope so.


Footnotes:
* The idea that the human experience of wellbeing is social, cultural and complex, and extends far beyond medical definitions of health.
** 'Self actualisation' appears at the apex of psychologist Abraham Maslow's 'hierarchy of needs' model and includes in its definition (among other things): "expressing one's creativity".

References:
1. Various demographic data available from www.theaudienceagency.org
2. Greenhalgh, T., Howick, J. & Maskrey, N. (2014). Evidence based medicine: a movement in crisis? BMJ g3725.
3. Stickley, T. (2015). A little rant about evidence, available from: https://ayrshirehealthandarts.wordpress.com/2015/03/31/dr-theo-stickley-a-little-rant-about-evidence/
4. Jenkins, T. (2015). Front Row debate (23rd Feb, 2015). Are artists owed a living? Online: BBC.
5. Monologue delivered at ESRC funded Seminar Series on Arts, Health & Wellbeing, 15th September 2014.

How big food and drink are using sport (Fri, 17 Feb 2017 06:00:00 +0000)

Guest post by Robin Ireland, Director of Research, Food Active and Healthy Stadia

You don't have to do much travelling to realise that the unhealthy alliance between sport and the Food and Drink Industry isn't only an issue in the UK.

I am lucky enough to be visiting New Zealand and Australia at the moment and it's easy to see all the same signs - and very similar marketing campaigns and messaging. Whether it's the All Blacks rugby team being pictured with the product of their "Official Hydration Partner", Gatorade, or the recent Australian Tennis Open full of alcohol advertisements (and I haven't even mentioned cricket), it's clear that the Food and Drink Industry have an international agenda.

Advertising featuring the All Blacks rugby team photographed in New Zealand

In January, the British Medical Journal published an editorial (Ireland and Ashton 2017)1 that I wrote (with Professor John Ashton CBE) about how Coca-Cola's publicity machine was subverting the Christmas message.

If anything, it's even more blatant in sport and we have been aware of it for some time from London's "Obesity Games" (Garde and Rigby 2012)2 to Rio's promotion of ultra-processed foods (Loughborough University)3. Even when spectators want healthier food, this choice is rarely made available to them.

George Monbiot recently referred to "Dark Money" (Monbiot 2017)4 which describes the funding of organisations involved in political advocacy that are not obliged to disclose where the money comes from. In public health terms, we may describe this as Commercial Determinants of Health where industry interests impact on our health. It is often linked to the increasingly sophisticated Corporate Social Responsibility policies being adopted by big corporations.

The latest of these is of course the deal just announced by the English Premier League and Cadburys criticised by the Obesity Health Alliance in a letter to The Times (Obesity Health Alliance 2017)5. Cadburys no doubt will argue that they are taking an ethical position to help educate people. But can we really take a chocolate company seriously that wishes to advise schoolchildren on nutrition, healthy eating and exercise?


FC Bayern München's branded energy drink
It is no coincidence that the mantra parroted by food and drink sponsors is that our diets are down to individual choice and that if we simply took more exercise we wouldn't be having the obesity epidemic now prevalent worldwide. This is rubbish. So called energy and sports drinks should have no part to play in the diet of the average member of the public. Kids do not need more sugar (or more protein for that matter) if they are eating a balanced diet with lots of fruit and veg. But of course the food and drink industry do not make their enormous profits in this way.

It is these concerns - amongst many others - that encouraged myself and colleagues to establish Healthy Stadia in 2005, of which I am a Director. Healthy Stadia takes a holistic and integrated approach to developing sports stadia and clubs as "health promoting settings":
"Healthy Stadia are those which promote the health of visitors, fans, players, employees and the surrounding community" (from Healthy Stadia website)6.

Healthy Stadia's Conference which will be held at the Emirates Stadium, London, in April will be discussing food and drink sponsorship in professional sport among other issues. I anticipate that these topics will come under increasing public scrutiny in years to come, as we develop more awareness of the impact that marketing has on our food and drink choices. (Cairns et al., 2013)7.

Sports fans and public health professionals alike should be questioning how 'Our Beautiful Games' are being manipulated by the Food and Drink Industry to promote ultra-processed food and drink - including alcohol - to audiences, often well populated by impressionable youngsters. Let's see if we can link up the campaigns in different countries to make a louder voice demanding change from the governing bodies of sport.
References:
  1. Ireland R and Ashton John R. (2017). Happy corporate holidays from Coca-Cola. BMJ 2017;356:i6833. http://www.bmj.com/content/356/bmj.i6833. 10 January 2017.
  2. Garde A and Rigby N. (2012). Going for gold – should responsible governments raise the bar on sponsorship of the Olympic games and other sporting events by food and beverage companies? Commun Law. 2012:356:42-9.
  3. Loughborough University Press Release (2016). Loughborough research calls for change in spectator food and drink provision at sports mega events such as Rio 2016. PR/16/158. http://www.lboro.ac.uk/media-centre/press-releases/2016/december/loughborough-research-calls-for-change-in-spectator-food-and-drink-provision-at-.html. 05 December 2016.
  4. Monbiot G. How corporate dark money is taking power on both sides of the Atlantic. The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/feb/02/corporate-dark-money-power-atlantic-lobbyists-brexit. 02 February 2017.
  5. Obesity Health Alliance (2017). Letter to The Times – Cadbury and Premier League Sponsorship. Accessed online at: http://obesityhealthalliance.org.uk/2017/02/06/letter-times-cadbury-premier-league-sponsorship/?utm_campaign=Cadbury%20letter. 06 February 2017.
  6. European Healthy Stadia Network. http://www.healthystadia.eu/about.html
  7. Cairns G, Angus K, Hastings, G and Caraher M (2013). Systematic reviews of the evidence on the nature, extent and effects of food marketing to children. A retrospective summary. Appetite 2013: 356:209-15. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666312001511. 03 March 2013.
All views expressed are exclusively those of the author.